• Trailer

    Frugal Innovation: How to Do More With Less

     



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    Trailer EN
  • NESTA HOSTS

    UK launch of Frugal Innovation

     

     



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    NESTA EN
  • Frugal Innovation

    reviewed by The Economist and FT

     

     



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    Book review FT and the Economist
  • Frugal Innovation

    How To Do More With Less

     

     



    Become a frugal innovator!

    Frugal Innovation
  • TED GLOBAL 2014

     

    Navi Radjou's talk on Frugal Innovation

    Video Available, Watch it now!

     



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    TED Global 2014 en
  • HOW FRUGAL INNOVATION IS REVIVING THE US ECONOMY

    Navi Radjou moderated a panel at the Commonwealth Club



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    US Eco
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Latest news

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09/02/2016

Frugal Innovation clinches CMI Management Book of the Year title, demonstrating how to do more with less

Business writers Navi Radjou and Jaideep Prabhu scoop top award at annual CMI Management Book of the Year Awards

Helping managers innovate with limited resources was a winning approach at the Chartered Management Institute’s (CMI) Management Book of the Year Awards 2016 last night [8 February 2016].

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02/11/2015

The Frugal Way to Grow

In China, the Siemens R&D team has designed a high-end computed tomography (CT scanning) device that’s simple enough for health professionals who are not doctors to use. To develop this, the company pioneered a type of innovation it called “industrial design thinking”: The innovators convened workshops with users of its devices and used craft supplies such as colored paper to build models in order to get a clearer idea of what people wanted.

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15/09/2015

Aetna's Frugal Healthcare Strategy

Mark Bertolini, the no-nonsense CEO of Aetna — one of the world’s leading health insurers — is not impressed with the U.S. healthcare system. In an interview with strategy+business, Bertolini called the sector “too bloated and accountable to no one.” The system — which will cost US$4.6 trillion, or 20 percent of U.S. GDP, by 2020 — “charges patients and rewards care providers on services delivered, not patient outcomes,” he said.